Recording and Stimulation Technologies for in vivo Electrophysiology in Conscious, Freely Behaving Rodents

Recording and Stimulation Technologies for in vivo Electrophysiology in Conscious, Freely Behaving Rodents

DATE: WEDNESDAY, OCT 25, 2017

TIME: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT (UTC -4)

Scientists discuss technological advancements and present novel application of new head-mounted, wireless sensors for neural recording and stimulation in conscious, freely moving animals.   

Neurological disease effects one in five people at some point in their lives. This creates a strong motivation for life science researchers to further investigate the mysteries of the brain and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Fortunately, rapid innovation in sensor miniaturization and novel integration of head-mounted, implantable wireless technologies with electrode interfaces has enabled scientists to investigate neuronal processes in greater detail than ever before. Neural recordings including up to 128 channels of real time EEG, ECoG, EMG, ECG and single unit/spike signals for telemetric experiments are no longer an obstacle. Untethered neural modulation and nerve blocking by electrical and optogenetic stimulation in both mice and rats, and single capsule combined neural stimulation with recording for closed-loop control is achievable. The application of these ground-breaking technologies is helping clarify the complex nature of various neuronal diseases, and identify novel treatment methods.

During this webinar, sponsored by Triangle BioSystems International (TBSI), scientists will present experimental methods and scientific findings from applications of in vivo electrophysiology in freely moving rodents using new head-mounted, wireless sensors. Attendees will learn new methods and prescribed best-practices for challenging in vivo electrophysiology experiments relevant to various neurological disease models. In addition, scientists will touch on the application of wireless, head-mounted sensors for neuronal recording and stimulation in Animal Behavior studies.

Register early and tell us about your research interests and challenges! 

Audience input will be used to guide content for the live webinar. When completing your registration form, tell us about your unique research interests and challenges related to wireless, head-mounted sensors for neuronal research and what you hope to learn about these technologies during the webinar.

Leave a Reply