Dr. Marcela Maus discusses the components and technologies used in making a T cell product, important considerations for efficacy, and underlying mechanisms of toxicity and resistance.

Genetically-modified T cell immunotherapy has achieved unprecedented responses in hematologic B cell malignancies, and there are now six different form of engineered T cells that have been modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that are FDA-approved for cancer.

In this webinar, Dr. Marcela Maus will discuss the components and technologies used in making a T cell product, some of the factors considered to be important for efficacy, and the underlying mechanisms of toxicity and resistance. She will also discuss the outlooks and recent data in development of CAR T cells and other forms of engineered T cells for solid tumors.

Key Topics Include:

  • Understand the components of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor and their mechanisms of action
  • Describe mechanisms of resistance that have been observed in the clinic with CAR T cells
  • Describe some of the challenges in development of engineered T cells for cancer

Presenters

Director, Cellular Immunotherapy Program; Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School

The Maus laboratory is interested in using genetic engineering techniques to re-direct T cells to find and kill tumor cells, while sparing healthy tissues. They aim to develop new ways to design molecular receptors to target T cells to liquid and solid tumors; use T cells as delivery vehicles for other drugs, and use drugs to help T cells work against tumors; and understand how T cells can work as “living drugs” to treat patients with cancer. The Maus Lab focuses on T cell biology and T cell engineering. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to re-direct T cells to specific antigens. Re-directing T cells with CARs is an alternative method of overcoming tolerance, and has shown great promise in the clinical setting for B cell malignancies such leukemia and lymphoma. However, successful application of this form of therapy to other cancers is likely to require refinements in the molecular and clinical technologies. The goal of the Maus lab is to design and evaluate next generation genetically-modified T cells as immunotherapy in patients with cancer.

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