Dr. Lee Kaplan discusses the role of the gastrointestinal tract and gut microbiota in the mechanism of action of bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatments of obesity in adults. Unlike many drugs prescribed for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery has a broad range of effects, including physiological impact on the gastrointestinal tract and gut microbiota.

In this final installment of our Obesity 2020 webinar series, Dr. Lee Kaplan will discuss late-breaking research and review various mechanisms of action of bariatric and metabolic surgery and how they affect the regulation of energy balance and metabolic function.

Presenters

Director
Obesity, Metabolism, and Nutrition Institute
Massachusetts General Hospital

Lee M. Kaplan, MD, PhD, is director of the Obesity, Metabolism, and Nutrition Institute and founding director of the Weight Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). His research focuses on the role of the gastrointestinal tract and gut microbiota in the regulation of energy balance and metabolic function, including the mechanism of action of bariatric and metabolic surgery, as well as the genetic determinants of obesity and its response to therapy. Dr. Kaplan is director of the subspecialty fellowship program in Obesity Medicine and Nutrition at MGH, director of the Blackburn Course in Obesity Medicine at Harvard Medical School, chair of the U.S. Obesity Medicine Fellowship Council, and associate director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Nutrition and Obesity Research Center at Harvard. He has served in many professional leadership roles and is a past president of The Obesity Society.

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