Join Dr. Joy Wu as she discusses the potential therapeutic approaches to age-related bone loss.

Osteoporosis is one of the most common degenerative diseases of aging. Half of adult women and one-quarter of adult men can expect to sustain an osteoporosis-related fracture. While current approaches to the treatment of osteoporosis can lower the risk of fracture, there is still no cure. In this webinar, Dr. Wu will review the pathophysiology of bone loss with aging, in particular the imbalance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. She will discuss stem cell sources of osteoblasts, anabolic signaling pathways, and targeting inflammation and senescence.

Key Topics Include:

  • Describe how bone formation and resorption are coupled and regulate bone mass
  • Describe factors that contribute to aging-related bone loss
  • Discuss benefits and limitations of current osteoporosis therapies

Presenters

Associate Professor
Endocrinology
Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Wu is a physician-scientist in endocrinology and directs a basic and translational research program that focuses on skeletal development, the bone marrow microenvironment, and stem cell therapies for bone. Her clinical practice focuses on metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and optimizing bone health in cancer survivors.

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