Join Dr. Merry Lindsey as she discusses her research involving the physiology of recovery from cardiac events.

Age plays a pivotal role in the deterioration of cardiovascular functionality, resulting in an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in older adults. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease has also been shown to increase with age, in both men and women, including the prevalence of atherosclerosis, stroke and, myocardial infarction.

Following myocardial infarction (MI), the left ventricle (LV) undergoes a series of cardiac wound healing responses that involve both the stimulation of robust inflammation to clear necrotic myocytes and tissue debris and the induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein synthesis to generate an infarct scar. Collectively, this process in known as LV remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a key regulator of LV remodeling post-MI, through direct effects on ECM turnover as well as indirect effects on the regulation of the major cell types that coordinate cardiac wound healing- namely the infiltrating leukocytes and the cardiac fibroblasts. We will discuss recent research that has expanded our understanding of MI LV remodeling, including recent proteomic advances focused on the ECM compartment to provide novel functional and translational insights. In summary, this webinar will provide an overview of how cardiac ECM research has evolved over the last decade and will provide insight into future directions that will drive further understanding of MMP directed cardiac ECM turnover after MI.

Presenters

Chair
Cellular and Integrative Physiology
University of Nebraska Medical Center

Dr. Merry Lindsey is Chair of Cellular and Integrative Physiology and Founding Director of the Center for Heart and Vascular Research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Her research has led to over 200 publications, and grant support from the American Heart Association, U.S. Veterans Administration, and the National Institutes of Health.

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